Fall 2017 First Year Writing Bibliography (Ben Breyer)

This bibliography features selected resources for First Year Writing: Legacy of the Mediterranean.

This brief selection of secondary sources were recommended by First Year Writing professors and librarians. They might help you get started with your research paper.


The Homeric Hymn to Demeter

Arthur, Marilyn. “Politics and Pomegranates: An Interpretation of the Homeric Hymn to Demeter.” The Homeric Hymn to Demeter: Translation, Commentary, and Interpretive Essays, edited by Helene P. Foley, Princeton University Press, 1994, pp. 212-242.

Keller, Mara Lynn. “The Eleusinian Mysteries of Demeter and Persephone: Fertility, Sexuality, and Rebirth.” Journal of Feminist Studies in Religion, vol. 4, no. 1, 1988, pp. 27–54.

Lord, Mary Louise. “Withdrawal and Return: An Epic Story Pattern in the Homeric Hymn to Demeter and in the Homeric Poems.” The Homeric Hymn to Demeter: Translation, Commentary, and Interpretive Essays, edited by Helene P. Foley, Princeton University Press, 1994, pp. 181-189.

Parker, Robert. “The ‘Hymn to Demeter’ and the ‘Homeric Hymns.’” Greece & Rome, vol. 38, no. 1, 1991, pp. 1–17.

Pratt, Louise H. “The Old Women of Ancient Greece and the Homeric Hymn to Demeter.” Transactions of the American Philological Association, vol. 130, no. 1, 2000, pp. 41–65.


The Odyssey

Buitron-Oliver, Diana, and Beth Cohen. “Between Skylla and Penelope: Female Characters of the Odyssey in Archaic and Classical Greek Art.” The Distaff Side: Representing the Female in Homer’s Odyssey, edited by Beth Cohen, Oxford University Press, 1995, pp. 29–58.

Osborne, Robin. “Homer’s Society.” The Cambridge Companion to Homer, edited by Robert Fowler, Cambridge University Press, 2004, pp. 206–219.

Peraino, Judith Ann. “Listening to the Sirens: Music as Queer Ethical Practice.”  GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies, vol. 9, no. 4, 2003, pp. 433-470.

Ruppersburg, Hugh. “‘Oh, so Many Startlements...’: History, Race, and Myth in O Brother, Where Art Thou?” Southern Cultures, vol. 9, no. 4, 2003, pp. 5–26.

Yarnall, Judith.  “Where Did Circe Come From?”  Transformations of Circe: The History of on Enchantress.  University of Illinois Press, 1994, pp. 26-52.


Sappho, poems

Dodson-Robinson, Eric. “Helen’s ‘Judgment of Paris’ and Greek Marriage Ritual in Sappho 16.” Arethusa, vol. 43, no. 1, 2010, pp. 1–20. 

Garner, R.Scott. “Oral Tradition and Sappho.” Oral Tradition, vol. 26, no. 2, 2012, pp. 413-444. 

Greene, Ellen. “Sappho, Foucault, and Women’s Erotics.” Arethusa, vol. 29, no. 1, 1996, pp. 1–14. 

Lefkowitz, Mary R. “Critical Stereotypes and the Poetry of Sappho.” Reading Sappho: Contemporary Approaches, edited by Ellen Greene, University of California Press, 1996, pp. 26–34.

Yatromanolakis, Dimitrios. “Alcaeus and Sappho.” The Cambridge Companion to Greek Lyric, edited by Felix Budelmann, Cambridge University Press, 2009, pp. 204–26.  


The Bacchae

Buxton, Richard. “New from Cithaeron: Narrators and Narratives in the ‘Bacchae’”. Pallas, no. 37, 1991, pp. 39–48.

March, Jennifer. “Euripides’ Bakchai: A Reconsideration in the Light of Vase-Paintings.” Bulletin of the Institute of Classical Studies, vol. 36, no. 6, 1989, pp. 33–65.

Easterling, P. E. “A Show for Dionysus.” The Cambridge Companion to Greek Tragedy, edited by P. E. Easterling, Cambridge University Press, 1997, pp. 36–53.

Ruck, Carl A. P. “The Wild and the Cultivated: Wine in Euripides’ Bacchae.” Journal of Ethnopharmacology, vol. 5, no. 3, 1982, pp. 231–270.

Thumiger, Chiara. “Animal World, Animal Representation, and the ‘Hunting-Model’: Between Literal and Figurative in Euripides’ ‘Bacchae.’” Phoenix, vol. 60, no. 3/4, 2006, pp. 191–210.


Andalusian Poetry

Garulo, Teresa. “Women in Medieval Classical Arab Poetry.” Writing the Feminine: Women in Arab Sources, edited by Randi Deguilhem and Manuela Marín, I.B. Tauris, 2002, pp. 25–40.

Guichard, Pierre. “The Social History of Muslim Spain from the Conquest to the End of the Almohad Régime.” The Legacy of Muslim Spain, edited by Salma Khadra Jayyusi and Manuela Marín, 2nd ed, E.J. Brill, 1994, pp. 679–708.

Heath, Peter. “Knowledge.” The Literature of Al-Andalus, edited by María Rosa Menocal et al., Cambridge University Press, 2000, pp. 96–125.

Lopez-Morillas, Consuelo. “Language.” The Literature of Al-Andalus, edited by María Rosa Menocal et al., Cambridge University Press, 2000, pp. 33–59.

Menocal, Maria Rosa. The Ornament of the World: How Muslims, Jews, and Christians Created a Culture of Tolerance in Medieval Spain. Little, Brown, c2002.

Ruggles, D.Fairchild. “Mothers of a Hybrid Dynasty: Race, Genealogy, and Acculturation in Al-Andalus.” Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies, vol. 34, no. 1, Dec. 2004, pp. 65–94. 

Sells, Michael. “Love.” The Literature of Al-Andalus, edited by María Rosa Menocal et al., Cambridge University Press, 2000, pp. 126–58.

Shamsie, Kamila. “Librarians, Rebels, Property Owners, Slaves: Women in Al-Andalus.” Journal of Postcolonial Writing, vol. 52, no. 2, Mar. 2016, pp. 178–88. 

Viguera, Maria. “On the Social Status of Andalusi Women.” The Legacy of Muslim Spain, edited by Salma Khadra Jayyusi and Manuela Marín, 2nd ed, E.J. Brill, 1994, pp. 709–24.


Abelard and Heloise, Letters

Constantine-Jackson, Jennifer. “Sapienter Amare Poterimus: On Rhetoric and Friendship in the Letters of Heloise and Abelard.” Friendship in the Middle Ages and Early Modern Age: Explorations of a Fundamental Ethical Discourse, edited by Albrecht Classen and Marilyn Sandidge, De Gruyter, 2010, pp. 247–80.

McCracken, Peggy. “The Curse of Eve: Female Bodies and Christian Bodies in Heloise’s Third Letter.” Listening to Heloise, edited by Bonnie Wheeler, Palgrave Macmillan, 2000, pp. 217–231. 

Nye, Andrea. “A Woman’s Thought or a Man’s Discipline? The Letters of Abelard and Heloise.” Hypatia, vol. 7, no. 3, 1992, pp. 1–22.

Ruys, Juanita. “Heloise, Monastic Temptation, and ‘Memoria’: Rethinking Autobiography, Sexual Experience, and Ethics.” Sexuality in the Middle Ages and the Early Modern Times: New Approaches to a Fundamental Cultural-Historical and Literary-Anthropological Theme, edited by Albrecht Classen, Walter de Gruyter, 2008, pp. 383–404.

Smith, Julie Ann. “Debitum Obedientie: Heloise and Abelard on Governance at the Paraclete.” Parergon, vol. 25, no. 1, Oct. 2008, pp. 1–23. 


The Canterbury Tales 

Cannon, Christopher. “Chaucer’s Style.” The Cambridge Companion to Chaucer, edited by Piero Boitani and Jill Mann, 2nd ed., Cambridge University Press, 2004, pp. 233–250.

Carter, Susan. "Coupling the Beastly Bride and the Hunter Hunted: What Lies Behind Chaucer's Wife of Bath's Tale." The Chaucer Review, vol. 37, no. 4, 2003, pp. 329-345.

Kassell, Lauren. ""All was this land full fill'd of faerie," or Magic and the Past in Early Modern England." Journal of the History of Ideas, vol. 67, no. 1, 2006, pp. 107-122.

Stanbury, Sarah. "EcoChaucer: Green Ethics and Medieval Nature." Chaucer Review: A Journal of Medieval Studies and Literary Criticism, vol. 39, no. 1, 2004, pp. 1-16.

Strohm, Paul. “The Social and Literary Scene in England.” The Cambridge Companion to Chaucer, edited by Piero Boitani and Jill Mann, 2nd ed., Cambridge University Press, 2004, pp. 1–19.


Citing your sources

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Last updated November 6, 2017