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Aug 30

Installation: "Time Enough" by Allison Costa

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Movement Lab, Milstein Center, LL020

This installation presents “Time Enough,” Allison Costa’s Post-Baccalaureate creative research project studying our perception and experience of time through dance and technology. It is composed of 10 smaller-scale experiments, or “clocks,” each exploring a different element of Allison’s research. The installation will use immersive and interactive projection to lead participants in a reflection on time that not only presents Allison’s research but also allows participants to see themselves within the projected experiments (or “clocks”) with the hope of displaying and celebrating their own experience of time through movement and technology.

Allison's "Time Enough" Installation will be open Monday through Friday 12:00pm-5:00pm from August 30th until September 10th, 2021. Please stop by! 

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"clock" or small-scale experiment from creative research project "Time Enough". bedroom with person on floor moving, one image is ghostly white and the other is in color with a PoseNet movement estimation skeleton.
Time Enough: Clock: November 2020 (Looptime), created by Allison Costa with PoseNet motion capture.

 


Bio: 

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Allison Costa dancing, reaching towards the camera, wearing a yellow shirt
Photo by Kurt Huckleberry.

 

Allison Costa (she/they) (BC’ 19, Dance and Computer Science) is a New York City based dancer, poet, burgeoning choreographer and computer scientist focusing on human-­computer interaction.

Fascinated with finding ways to visualize the intangible, she is experimenting with using technology to expand our understanding of human movement potential, as well as using graphics and dance to physicalize data; the immaterial information “stored” in computers. In Spring 2019 she investigated inherent movement inclinations in dancers as a Student Artist in Residence at the Movement Lab. Specifically, she examined improvisation and how, if given feedback via technology, a dancer can adjust their movement to minimize redundancy and expand their range. She hopes to unite the two universal languages of dance and technology to engage a larger audience and breakdown the gap between these two symbiotic fields. For more information go to https://allisoncosta.com/